Jarvis C McInnis

Assist Professor of English

Jarvis C. McInnis holds a BA in English from Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi, and a Ph.D. in English & Comparative Literature from Columbia University in the City of New York.  Jarvis is an interdisciplinary scholar of African American & African Diaspora literature and culture, with teaching and research interests in the global south (primarily the US South and the Caribbean), sound studies, performance studies, and visual culture.

He is currently at work on his first book project, tentatively titled, “The Afterlives of the Plantation: Aesthetics, Labor, and Diaspora in the Global Black South,” which aims to reorient the geographic contours of black transnationalism and diaspora by exploring the hemispheric linkages between southern African American and Caribbean literature and culture in the early twentieth century. Jarvis’s research has been supported by numerous grants and fellowships, including the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, the Ford Foundation Pre-doctoral and Dissertation Fellowships, and Princeton University’s Department of African American Studies postdoctoral fellowship. His work appears or is forthcoming in journals and venues such as CallalooMELUSMississippi QuarterlyPublic Books, and The Global South.

Professor McInnis hopes to curate a classroom space where his students feel free to take intellectual risks, and where they can use African diaspora literature and culture to celebrate and affirm black humanity and creativity; interrogate and dismantle systems of power, injustice, and inequality; and imagine new futures and more just worlds. 

Education

  • Ph.D., Columbia University 2015
  • M.Phil., Columbia University 2012
  • M.A., Columbia University 2010

McInnis, JC. "Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930." MELUS: The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States 32.2: 247-249.

McInnis, JC. ""Writing Around the Eagles': A Praise Song for Wanda Coleman." Callaloo: A Journal of African Diaspora Arts and Letters 37.2 (2014): 190-193.